Variety articles

Sociolinguistics in Practice: Lawrence Talk

Anthony Burgess’ “A Clockwork Orange” (1962), with its intuitive vocabulary, has inspired me to document my linguistic environments. I will write about a different environment each week without explaining any vocabulary used. My hope is that readers will gradually learn what these words mean as they read on and notice if I insert a word

Almost Heaven

Previously: While everyone else fled underground, Lyra and Alice were on a road trip during the apocalypse. After Alice got hurt, Lyra tended to her wounds in a gas station.  Lyra wakes to light streaming in through the gas station windows. She blinks, shielding her eyes from the brightness, then looks down to see Alice

Rings!

In my geometry class during my sophomore year of high school, there was a girl who wore a bunch of rings on like … all of her fingers. It was probably the equivalent to wearing a pair of brass knuckles, and that’s pretty cool if you ask me. I admired the ability to wear rings

Cowboy Boots, I Love You

So, I have another dilemma. A fashion dilemma and a big one. It has to do with shoes and the fact that I want more than I can afford. I know what you’re thinking. Yes. This is a small dilemma. However, to me it is very important. Throughout my 20 years of life on this

The Life Dissonant

Sun Ra’s music just makes sense sometimes. Willem de Kooning’s artwork (not my namesake) just makes sense sometimes. Fascists hate abstract art. Already enough reason to like it, but there’s something there. They denounce it as “Degenerate art;” that sounds cool as hell, though.   It’s a kind of solidarity, really. The exact narrative —

Almost Heaven

Previously: Rather than join everyone else in a bunker, Lyra and Alice are taking a road trip during the apocalypse. Content Warning: Descriptions of blood and surgical procedures.  Ten miles east of the Grand Canyon, the wind starts to pick up. Lyra can feel it shake the body of their transport as she adjusts her

Sociolinguistics in Practice: Wisconsin Talk

Anthony Burgess’ “A Clockwork Orange” (1962), with its intuitive vocabulary, has inspired me to document my linguistic environments. I will write about a different environment each week without explaining any vocabulary used. My hope is that readers will gradually learn what these words mean as they read on and notice if I insert a word

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