Tag Archives: ali shuger

Book Review “Ordinary Beast”

Poet, writer, teacher and Executive Director at Cave Canem Foundation Nicole Sealey, in her first book, lends clarity to such inscrutable topics as death, memory, love and loss. Constructing voices of drag queens (as in her “Legendary” poems), maintaining a fluid persona through ever-changing perspectives and often borrowing words and forms from other poets, she

The Meaning of Life

It has become more and more difficult, as we’ve become more and more connected through technology, to simply leave the tech at home and let your communication be unmediated by any electronic middle-man. This is one of Associate Professor of English David McGlynn’s goals in his newest class, loftily titled “The Meaning of Life” –

“Symphonic Dances” lights up Chapel

  From 8 to 9:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26, the Lawrence Memorial Chapel was filled with the wonderful, resonant sounds of Associate Professor of Music Anthony Padilla’s piano performance. The recital, entitled “Symphonic Dances,” featured orchestral transcriptions—either piano pieces arranged for orchestra, or orchestral pieces arranged for piano. Between each piece, Padilla provided the

Film Review: “Hotel Chevalier”

With Midterm Reading Period in the past and finals looming in the not-so-distant future, I can imagine that many Lawrentians—myself included—do not always have quite enough time to sit through a feature-length film. Wes Anderson’s “Hotel Chevalier,” coming in at about 13 minutes and readily available on YouTube, can remedy a movie craving without taking

Wet Ink Ensemble defies expectations

Students gathered in Harper Hall on Friday Jan. 27 to hear Wet Ink, a New-York based experimental music ensemble. Many of those in attendance whom I talked to were unsure what to expect. Personally, I did not expect what I received. Wet Ink utilizes instruments: flute, violin, piano, saxophone and voice, namely, to their full

Film Review: “Fargo”

It is rare to see the mundane meet the thrilling and the sweet meet the sinister in a way that is as satisfactorily uncomfortable, darkly humorous and oddly heartwarming as is “Fargo.” The film thrives off of the contrasts it creates. In typical Coen brothers style, the directors play with the limits of unconventionality: placing

Top