Tag Archives: staff ed

Staff Editorial: The CAS: Combating Academic Stress

One of the universal truths about this university is that academic stress is inevitable, and especially at this point in the term. In previous editorials, The Lawrentian’s Editorial Board has criticized Lawrence’s culture of academic and extracurricular overwork, and has challenged the claim that our campus is in fact “healthy.” The Center for Academic Success

Staff Editorial: What is going on with Lawrence’s music scene?

The Conservatory gives Lawrence students the opportunity to see music played at a high level by their peers. Because of the high caliber of musicianship attracted by the Conservatory, student bands also provide high-quality performances in a more informal setting. This term however, Lawrence’s live music scene has been fairly inactive, despite at least three

Staff Editorial: Is our medical access adequate?

As colder weather approaches, more and more people are frequenting the Buchanan Kiewit Wellness Center for medical attention. From seasonal allergies to roommates with unbearable coughs, students are finding Fall Term slowly growing harder as poor health complicates writing essays and studying for exams. Despite having active health services and a regular campus nurse, there

Staff Editorial: American Sign Language at Lawrence

While Lawrence University offers a healthy variety of languages, we currently lack any curricular opportunities to learn American Sign Language (ASL). While ASL is not technically a foreign language, it remains unfamiliar to many Americans. Our society lacks the ability to communicate with the deaf community, which studies estimate includes over one million Americans. As

Staff Editorial: Consider the standardized test

Lawrence University recently participated in “Defining Promise: Optional Standardized Testing Policies in American College and University Admissions,” a nation-wide study which attempted to analyze the difference between the success rates of students who submitted standardized test scores and those who did not. The study found only “trivial” differences between the two. Though score-submitters performed slightly

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