Trumpet recital enraptures crowd

On Saturday, Feb. 23, Amos Egleston performed his junior recital with the help of some other talented performers. He performed six pieces in a 45-minute exhibition.

The first piece was “The Four Corners” by Devin Drobka played by Egleston on trumpet with assistance from sophomore Ali Remondini on double bass. This was a pensive tune with a consistent bass rhythm, and Egleston provided a haunting melody on horn. The piece eventually faded into silence with a small break following, allowing junior cellist Julian Bennett time to set up for the next piece.

Sophomore Hannah Baron joined in on cello for the next piece, “Opposites: Andante I and II” by Ronn Cox, and she really took the crowd’s breath away with her incredible performance. One thing I appreciate about Egleston is that he really gives his accompanying musicians their moments in the spotlight, and Baron took full advantage of hers. This was an energetic piece where at one point, Baron began to furiously slap her cello with both her hand and bow while also remaining technically flawless throughout a thrilling piece.

Next up was “La Mandolinata” by Herman Bellstedt, a lovely and melodic piece that Egleston performed with fantastic assistance on the piano by fifth-year Milou de Meij. It felt like something out of an old Hollywood movie. It was easy to imagine this piece being the main score to a classic film.

For the fifth performance of the evening, Egleston brought out sophomore trumpet player Margaret Thompson to assist in a couple of duets, one by Johann Stamitz and the other by Pierre Francois Clodomir. The two performers played very well off of each other. For the last performance, Egleston performed his own original piece entitled, “We Are All Covered Green.” He was accompanied by Remondini on double bass and sophomore Allie Goldman on trombone. This really showed how multitalented Egleston is, while at the same time showcasing the talents of other musicians. It was a great recital and one can only hope Egleston’s senior recital is just as good, if not better.

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